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Roses

Henleaze Garden Shop stock Harkness Masterpiece roses.


Harkness Roses have been breeding and growing over 200 varieties of exquisite British Roses for more than 140 years. Celebrated for their astounding beauty, delightful fragrance and repeat flowering blooms, Harkness roses have been ever-present in Britain’s gardens for decades. Offering some of the finest British Roses currently available for garden use, with reliability, disease resistance and flowering performance that is second to none.



 

Roses Oct' 22

Garden Bush CLAIRE MARSHALL DUKE OF EDINBURGH ROSE VICTORIA PENDLETON Masterpiece Bush Varieties AMBER QUEEN BETTY HARKNESS CAROLINE VICTORIA FELLOWSHIP HARRY EDLAND L'AIMANT PAISLEY ABBEY PINK ABUNDANCE PRIDE & PREJUDICE PRIDE OF ENGLAND SAMARITAN SUSAN DANIEL SWEET REVELATION WELL BEING YORK MINSTER Charity Roses DAME DEBORAH JAMES ROSE THE ENGLAND RUGBY ROSE Shrub Roses SIMPLE GOLD SIMPLE PEACH Special Moments CONGRATULATIONS REMEMBERANCE WITH LOVE Climbing Roses CHAWTON COTTAGE CUMBERLAND GINGER SYLLABUB HIGH HOPES PENNY LANE STARLIGHT SYMPHONY SWEET SYRIE THE PRINCE'S TRUST


 

Roses: planting

Roses can be expensive plants, but they last for many, many years and are easy to establish if you follow a few simple steps on planting and aftercare.


Here are some steps to planting roses in the garden:

1. In the area where the rose or roses are to be planted, mix in at least one bucket of well-rotted organic matter per square metre, forking it into the top 20-30cm (8in-1ft) of soil. Farmyard manure is ideal for this.

2. Apply general fertiliser, at 100g per sq m (3oz per sq yd) over the surface of the planting area and fork it in to the same depth as the organic matter. Note: if you are using a mycorrhizal fungi (e.g. Rootgrow) then it is best not to apply a fertiliser at all as phosphorus (found in general fertilisers and superphosphate) can suppress the fungus.

3. For each rose dig a hole roughly twice the width of the plant's roots and the depth of a spade's blade.

4. Carefully tease out the roots of container plants because, if this is not done, the roots may be very slow to extend outwards, leaving the young plant more susceptible to drought in summer.

5. Place the rose in the centre of the hole and, using a small cane to identify the top of the planting hole, ensure the graft union (i.e. where the cultivar joins the rootstock and the point from which the branches originate) is at soil level (not below as this is reported to increase the risk of rose dieback).

6. Back-fill gently with the excavated soil and organic matter mixture.

Spacing depends on type and habit. Check catalogue or label details.

7. If you are replacing old roses with new roses, ensure that you dig out the soil to a depth and width of 45cm (18in) and exchange it with soil from a different part of the garden, as roses are at risk from replant disease, also known as soil sickness.

- RHS: Guide to planting roses.

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